The future is not as old as we thought

Expectations of future UK life expectancy have declined for several years now. This is not to say that current life expectancy has decreased, but rather than estimates of future mortality improvements are being lowered, pushing down future estimated life expectancy.

One report indicates this change may roll back a year of expected mortality improvements. So perhaps those optimistic stories about “the first person to live to 200 1,000 has already been born” will fade for a while.

The thing is, it’s no utterly crazy to think about extreme life extension for currently living people. We don’t need to solve ageing in the next 40 years for a 40 year old to live to 200 or 1,000. In the next 40 years, we need to extend life by enough time to allow the research for the next 40 year extension and so on.

I’m feeling a little old myself with a milestone birthday coming up in a couple of days. For now, 50 years still feels like a long time, although Asimov’s The Foundation series and the Long Now crowd would likely shame me into thinking I am a super myopic actuary.

Published by David Kirk

David Kirk runs Milliman’s actuarial consulting practice in Africa. He is an actuary and is the creator of New Business Margin on Revenue. He specialises in risk and capital management, regulatory change and insurance strategy . He also has extensive experience in embedded value reporting, insurance-related IFRS and share option valuation. He has been involved in significant insurance projects across Sub Saharan Africa and in the Middle East.

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